Indian Temple Architecture

Indian Temple Architecture

Hindu temple architecture has many varieties of style, though the basic nature of the Hindu temple remains the same, with the essential feature an inner sanctum, the garbha grihaor womb-chamber, where the primary Murtior the image of a deity is housed in a simple bare cell.Almost all Indian art has been religious, and almost all forms of artistic tradition have been deeply conservative. The Hindu temple developed over two thousand years and its architectural evolution took place within the boundaries of strict models derived solely from religious considerations.Hindu temple architecture reflects a synthesis of arts, the ideals of dharma, beliefs, values and the way of life cherished under Hinduism. The temple is a place forTirtha- pilgrimage.All the cosmic elements that create and celebrate life in Hindu pantheon, are present in a Hindu temple – from fire to water, from images of nature to deities, from the feminine to the masculine, from kamato artha , from the fleeting sounds and incense smells to Purusha – the eternal nothingness yet universality – is part of a Hindu temple architecture.A number of architectural texts known as the Shilpashastras were written in early medieval times. These refer to three major styles of temple architecture, Nagara, Dravida, and Vesara. The

  • Nagara style is associated with the land between the Himalayas and Vindhyas.
  • Dravida style with the land between the Krishna and Kaveri rivers,
  • Vesara style is sometimes associated with the area between the Vindhyas and the Krishna river